At 1MFWF, we always want to highlight work that’s happening around the country and across the globe pertaining to work flexibility. While our own blog features regular contributions from experts on this topic, we also keep an eye out for great articles elsewhere on the web. Here are some recent items not to miss.

It’s Time To Let Go And Let Your Employees Work From Anywhere
Ivan Howard Chan, Fast Company, Sept 21
Working from home may no longer be just a benefit for digital nomads or location independent freelancers. Flexible work may in fact be a plausible solution to some of our nation’s most pressing environmental and economic problems, from growing traffic congestion to urban infrastructure. It’s Time To Let Go And Let Your Employees Work From Anywhere discusses some of the real-life as well as larger scale benefits that flexible work can have on the planet and nation’s economic future.

Life is messy. If we want the brightest workforce, we need more flexible work
Lisa Annese, The Guardian, Sept 20
The future of the workforce is changing, and it demands flexible work. According to the World Economic Forum, we are on the “cusp of a fourth industrial revolution.” Technology, globalization, socioeconomic and demographic shifts, and the 24/7 marketplace are all transforming the way in which we work and live, and all point towards increased flexibility. Read more: Life is messy. If we want the brightest workforce, we need more flexible work.

It’s Time to Kill the 9-to-5
Rebecca Greenfield, Bloomberg, Sept 19
Our nation seems to be holding onto what partner at Aon-Hewitt Carol Sladek calls an “hours mentality.” But being hung up on the clock and sticking to a 9-to-5 schedule doesn’t actually make sense for most people, and ends up costing employers thousands of dollars a year. Learn more: It’s Time to Kill the 9-to-5.

Seattle City Council approves worker-scheduling law
Janet L. Tu, Seattle Times, Sept 19
On September 19, 2016, Seattle took another step towards addressing income inequality, becoming the second major U.S. city to regulate how food-service and large retailer employers schedule their workers. This new law helps students, workers of color, working families, and young people by “providing stability and clarity to their work schedule,” according to this article by the Seattle Times: Seattle City Council approves worker-scheduling law.

The Case FOR Workplace Flexibility And The Correlation To High Performance
Nancy Hromin, B&T, Sept 9
Earlier this month, B&T published an opinion piece from MAW Communications creative partner Michael Willcocks entitled, Workplace Flexibility Is A Privilege, Not A Right. In this follow-up piece, The Case FOR Workplace Flexibility And The Correlation To High Performance, author and principal of Culture Zone Nancy Hromin says, “if you look at the facts then giving your staff flexibility actually brings home the benefits in spades,” noting the hundreds of extensive studies published by leading research institutions.

Why a four-day workweek is not good for your health
Allard Dembe, The Conversation, Sept 2
Although the compressed workweek is one of many possible flexible options, it may not be the best choice. Allard Dembe has been studying the health effects of working longer hours for nearly 30 years, and his results suggest that the longer hours required in a shorter time period by a compressed week may do more harm than good. Supposed benefits of this compressed schedule include more time to pursue leisurely activities and spend more time with one’s friends and family; however, the risks include increased chances of arthritis, diabetes, heart disease, cancer and more. Read more from Dembe about the potential adverse effects of a four-day workweek: Why a four-day workweek is not good for your health.

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