At 1MFWF, we always want to highlight work that’s happening around the country and across the globe pertaining to work flexibility. While our own blog features regular contributions from experts on this topic, we also keep an eye out for great articles elsewhere on the web. Here are some recent items not to miss.

Balancing act: Organizations slowly move toward offering flexibility
Greg Kratz, Deseret News, Jan 28
A new report from the Society for Human Resource Management gives both good news and bad news on the state of flex. While 52 percent for their surveyed organizations offer their employees flexible work arrangements, only 33 percent of these allow flex for the majority of their workers (a drop from past years). Read more in Deseret News, Balancing act: Organizations slowly move toward offering flexibility.

Flexible Work Schedules: Good for Your Health and Your Sleep
Jill Krasny, Inc, Jan 27
Getting a good night’s sleep often feels like a luxury, but in fact it should be considered a necessity. Not getting enough rest not only makes us inattentive and less productive, but can also lead to more disease and a shorter life span. So how do we fit more sleep into busy lives? Work Flexibility. Read more in Inc: Flexible Work Schedules: Good for Your Health and Your Sleep.

‘Equal pay for equal work’ isn’t so simple
Jodi Beggs, The Boston Globe, Jan 26
In his State of the Union address last week, President Obama called for “equal pay for equal work,” a plea to end wage disparities based on gender. While his proposed Paycheck Fairness Act is a step in the right direction, research from Harvard economist Claudia Goldin suggests that what we really need to end the gender pay gap is more access to work flexibility. As we mark the anniversary of the signing of the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act today, read more from economist Jodi Beggs in the Boston Globe: ‘Equal pay for equal work’ isn’t so simple.

Memo to work martyrs: Long hours make you less productive
Bob Sullivan, CNBC, Jan 26
Putting in more hours equates to getting more done, right?  Wrong. According to a Stanford study published last year, an employee working a 70 hour week doesn’t accomplish any more than one working 55 hours. Meanwhile, those extra 15 hours come with higher costs in electricity, machinery, supervisory labor, and so on. Read more in CNBC: Memo to work martyrs: Long hours make you less productive.

A Working from Home Experiment Shows High Performers Like It Better
Nicholas Bloom & John Roberts, Harvard Business Review, Jan 23
Last fall we interviewed Stanford economist Nick Bloom on the business case for telecommuting. He and colleague John Roberts share more details on their research showing the benefits of work-from-home policies in the Harvard Business Review: A Working from Home Experiment Shows High Performers Like It Better.

How the Future of Work May Make Many of Us Happier
Anne-Marie Slaughter, Huffington Post, Jan 21
Anne-Marie Slaughter, president of the New America Foundation and author of the Atlantic article Why Women Still Can’t Have It All, discusses the future of work and the on-demand economy in the Huffington Post. The growth of project-based and shareable work has the potential to lead to less consumerism and more time for experiences that improve quality of life. Read more: How the Future of Work May Make Many of Us Happier.

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