At 1MFWF, we always want to highlight work that’s happening around the country and across the globe pertaining to work flexibility. While our own blog features regular contributions from experts on this topic, we also keep an eye out for great articles elsewhere on the web. Here are some recent items not to miss.

Disabilities Offer a Challenge for Job Seekers and the Workplace
Mia Mancini, Workforce, July 17
A recent article by Workforce magazine reveals the challenges of professionals with disabilities in both searching for and maintaining a job. While the Americans with Disabilities Act requires that employers provide “reasonable accommodations to qualified employees with disabilities, unless doing so would pose an undue hardship,” there has been little change in the total unemployment numbers for people with disabilities since the act’s enactment in 1990. According to the director of communications at Accessibility Partners Sharon Rosenblatt, the best solution to these issues for employers to adopt a flexible attitude and to accommodate professional’s varying work location and hours. Read more about how employers and professionals with disabilities can better navigate this workplace issue: Disabilities Offer a Challenge for Job Seekers and the Workplace.

This 1 Dad Wearing His Newborn to Work Is Seriously Cuteness Overload
Murphy, Moroney, POPSUGAR, July 17
Tom Williams, a Chicago-based chiropractor, made headlines earlier this month when word spread about his solution to working and raising his young son. Williams wears his son at work a couple days a week, a decision that he and his wife made in order to balance caring for their nine week old baby and balancing their busy work schedule. Wearing newborns is also a healthier choice for the development of the baby, including less of a risk of colic and crying and improved temperature control and sleep cycles. The parents expect to continue the practice so long as it doesn’t impact his patients. Read more: This 1 Dad Wearing His Newborn to Work Is Seriously Cuteness Overload.

Work from home people earn more, quit less, and are happier than their office-bound counterparts
Shana Lynch, Quartz, July 12
Stanford Graduate School of Business professor Nicholas Bloom conducted a two-year study on working from home with Ctrip, the largest travel agency in China. He found that employees experienced a 13% increase in productivity, and the company experienced a 50% reduction in employee resignations. Bloom is now on a a mission to change the negative perception of flexible work, and shares more of his insights from the study in this 1 Million for Work Flexibility interview. Learn more about why Work from home people earn more, quit less, and are happier than their office-bound counterparts.

Some Employers Are Rethinking Telework, Citing A Need For Better Collaboration
Yuki Noguchi, NPR: All Tech Considered, July 11
IBM made headlines last year when it began to recall some of its remote work employees, yet the company isn’t alone. Bank of America, Yahoo, and Reddit have also called their telecommuting employees back into the office, and the trend extends beyond the software industry. IBM made the switch because it claimed lower levels of engagement from its remote workers; however, telework overall, continues to increase, with approximately 40% of employers allowing employees to regularly work from home. Read more about where things stand with telework today: Some Employers Are Rethinking Telework, Citing A Need For Better Collaboration.

When the gender pay gap is your business model
Kasey Edwards, Brisbane Times, July 10
Despite efforts to eliminate the gender pay gap, women continue to be paid less than men. Employers aren’t usually quick to admit, and especially not brag about the benefits of underpaying their female employees—that is until entrepreneur Peter McConnell revealed his own practice of doing so in the Australian Financial Review. McConnell attributes the growth of this online business to “the labour of underpaid mothers,” and suggests that many other companies have utilized this same practice to achieve growth. Learn more: When the gender pay gap is your business model.

A small accounting software firm focused on inclusivity and flexibility to become India’s best employer
Ananya Bhattacharya, Quartz India, July 6
California-based Intuit, a relatively “low-profile software company,” was recently named the top  employer in India. Surrounded by industry leaders such as Google India and American Express India, Intuit jumped up nine spots from last year to earn the top spot on the list. The company attributes its “self-awareness and targeted evolution” to its accomplishment, and maintains a focus on keeping its startup culture alive, healthy living, and opening up. Some of Intuit’s highlights include its flexible scheduling arrangements, allotting 10% unstructured time, and offering 26 weeks maternity leave. Read more about the company’s evolution to the top: A small accounting software firm focused on inclusivity and flexibility to become India’s best employer.

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